Larry Barnard Joins Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican as President and CEO of San Martín Campus

Larry BarnardDignity Health-St. Rose Dominican has named Larry Barnard as president and CEO of its San Martín Campus. Opened in 2006, San Martín is one of three Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican hospitals in southern Nevada. Barnard will start in early December and will report to Brian Brannman, vice president of operations for Dignity Health Nevada.

Barnard brings an extensive and impressive range of health-care administrative experience to this role, including his most-recent position as chief executive officer of University Medical Center of Southern Nevada. Before he was appointed its CEO, he served as UMC’s chief operating officer for two years. Prior to his roles at UMC, Barnard was Valley Hospital Medical Center’s associate administrator and acting chief operating officer, and the associate administrator at Summerlin Hospital Medical Center. He also worked in hospital administration at facilities in Southern California and North Carolina.

“I am impressed with the diversity and complexity of Barnard’s past accomplishments, and his health-care management acumen,” said Rod Davis, senior vice president for Dignity Health Nevada. “Larry is known for combining a focus on top-notch performance with compassionate, patient-centered care. He is also regarded for his skills as a team builder with physicians, community leaders, employees and peers. I am extremely pleased to welcome a leader of Barnard’s caliber to Dignity Health.”

Barnard graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point and served as a U.S. Army captain for five years. He received an MBA from the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business.

About Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican

As the community’s only not-for-profit, religiously sponsored hospital system, Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican has been guided by the vision and core values of the Adrian Dominican Sisters for more than 65 years. As the Henderson and Las Vegas communities grow, the three St. Rose Dominican hospitals — the Rose de Lima, Siena and San Martín Campuses — and more than 3,400 employees will continue the Sisters’ mission of serving people in need. St. Rose Dominican is a member of the 21-state Dignity Health network of nearly 11,000 physicians, 56,000 employees, and more than 300 care centers, including hospitals, urgent and occupational care, imaging centers, home health, and primary care clinics. For more information, visit our website at www.strosehospitals.org or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or our Blog.

Meet Dr. Barbara Atkinson – Planning Dean, UNLV School of Medicine

Barbara Atkinson, UNLV School of Medicine Planning Dean. (R. Marsh Starks / UNLV Photo Services)

Barbara Atkinson, UNLV School of Medicine Planning Dean. (R. Marsh Starks / UNLV Photo Services)

Dr. Barbara Atkinson was just settling into retirement from the University of Kansas Medical Center when Karen West, dean of UNLV’s School of Dental Medicine, called. UNLV was looking for an experienced administrator to launch a much-needed School of Medicine. Atkinson began to skim the materials and soon was absorbed by the reports outlining the region’s medical infrastructure needs. The statistics were daunting — Las Vegas is the largest city without an allopathic medical school — but she also saw the tremendous opportunity to do what doctors do: help people.

Here the planning dean for the new UNLV School of Medicine explains how she got into medicine and shares her thoughts on the challenges ahead.


I was truly an outlier. I was a housewife until my children went to kindergarten and the only young mother in my medical school class. My own mother and mother-in-law both thought the kids would be ruined. But my father, a biochemist, and husband, a physician, both encouraged me.

I thought I would focus on cancer research but soon found myself wanting to change how things were done. When I was director of the cytopathology lab at the University of Pennsylvania, I thought there should be a better way of diagnosing cancer than just looking in a microscope and deciding it looks like cancer. We tried to do it by research, but when that didn’t work, I decided that I could better make a difference as an administrator. So that’s where my career took me.

For the most part, I think the doctor/God complex is a bygone.

Doctors used to be so paternalistic. They thought they knew what was best and just did it — sometimes without really talking to the patient. I think having more women in the profession helped change that. Women are more open to discussions.

It’s also a reflection of access to information. Patients are better advocates for themselves. Unfortunately, there’s also so much noise in the system.

Look at the anti-vaccination disaster. Kids shouldn’t be dying of measles. Adults shouldn’t be getting whooping cough. The person who says vaccines caused her kid’s autism can get just as much media attention as a doctor with actual expertise and scientific data. The layperson can’t always separate the importance of their two statements. And it seems to be human nature that we’re more taken by the scary statement than by the reassuring one.

That’s a danger for medical students too. They might Google to find answers too. So you have to teach students to think, to find information, assess it, and apply it.

You can’t teach students the one right treatment because it changes almost every day. I don’t think there’s a drug today being used in the same way as when I learned about it in medical school — except maybe aspirin.

The vision for this school is exactly right.

Building the medical school from scratch allows us to take all the best ideas in medical education and put them together in a new way — in a way that’s right for future doctors and for this region. At established schools, it’s hard and time-consuming to unseat some of the methods that are now becoming outmoded.

We won’t have many lectures or routine dissections in gross anatomy. We’ll have virtual gross anatomy with MRIs and CT scans, the same technology doctors use every day in practice.

Our curriculum will be problem-based. Students will be given a symptom, like a cough, and have to learn what causes it, the mechanics of coughing, the possible treatments. They’ll be focused on solving the problem, in much the same way that they’ll have to as practicing physicians.

It’s a more intensive experience, particularly for faculty. It appeals to the ones who are true teachers at heart, but it’s also proven to be more effective for producing good doctors.

I was shocked at the state of medical access here. Nevada ranks No. 45 out of 50 states in the number of doctors per capita here.

Everyone seems to have a story about long wait times and having to go to California or Arizona for their care. The problem is particularly acute in accessing specialists.

One woman told me how she went to Baylor Medical Center for a fairly routine dermatology appointment because she had trouble getting an appointment in a realistic time. You can’t get a liver transplant here at all. The transplant surgeons who are here can only harvest livers and send them out, although they do kidney transplants here.

One mother couldn’t find a rheumatologist to treat her son with arthritis. There are no pediatric arthritis specialists here. Imagine being that mother. Imagine being that child.

If your financial resources are limited, you just keep waiting.

Las Vegas also has the least number of psychiatrists per capita in the country. This, of course, taxes all of our community resources. It affects criminal justice and social service programs as well as our schools. So mental health and addiction treatments will be a significant area of focus for the school.

Those in the medical community here are just as frustrated as patients. Early major supporters of this new school have been the large physician groups and hospitals that have to recruit medical professionals from out of state. They can’t recruit fast enough to fill the extraordinary demand, particularly for specialists.

We’ll see some relief almost immediately as faculty come in. They’ll bring their practices and begin seeing patients almost immediately. We’ll start hiring this spring.

Recruiting them is actually pretty exciting. This appeals to people who want to truly put their stamp on something and use their experience to make a profound difference by building programs. Others are bold and aggressive and recognize the advancements that can be made by bringing extensive research and clinical trials to this population.

There’s really not much pushback on building this school — the need is so apparent. Some people have proposed that the problem could be solved by expanding residencies, but that’s just a piece, and it doesn’t address the need for more specialists and for the types of research studies and clinical trials that an academic medical school will bring.

Others have said that UNR should just expand, but in my experience distance is prohibitive. When I was at what’s now called Drexel University, the Philadelphia and Pittsburgh campuses were 300 miles apart and extremely difficult to manage.

I think having a medical school here will raise aspirations for Southern Nevada’s young people. It will make becoming a doctor — or entering any of the much-needed health care professions — that much more attainable.

The medical school also will make an extraordinary economic impact in the community. It’s a wise investment of resources for a healthier population and for economic diversification. People who travel for care will now spend those dollars here. We’ll have a healthier, more productive population. Within 10 years, we will have created 5,300 new jobs and have a $1.2 billion dollar annual economic impact.

And, I hope, we won’t be hearing those heart-breaking stories from people who endured pain or whose diseases progressed while they were on long waiting lists.

MountainView Hospital First in Las Vegas to Offer the da Vinci Xi Robot

MountainView Hospital and its Las Vegas Institute for Robotic Surgery is the first facility in Las Vegas to receive the da Vinci Xi® Surgical System, which offers patients less invasive options and faster recovery from a variety of surgeries.

he da Vinci Xi arrives on the loading dock at MountainView Hospital on Thursday

The da Vinci Xi arrives on the loading dock at MountainView Hospital on Thursday

The new technology, approved by the FDA on April 1, provides advanced robotic technology including high-definition, 3-D visualization. It also allows for enhanced dexterity and greater precision and control for the surgeon.

Being the first Las Vegas hospital to offer the da Vinci Xi as a surgical option reinforces MountainView’s commitment to the healthcare of Southern Nevada’s residents and speaks to the depth and strength of MountainView’s robotic surgery program, said Chris Mowan, MountainView CEO.

“MountainView’s new addition, the da Vinci Xi, puts MountainView on the leading edge for minimally invasive surgical procedures,” Mowan said. “This is a significant advancement in patient care for the Las Vegas Valley.”

The hospital received the da Vinci Xi on Thursday, November 20. Dr. Arnold D. Chung, cardiothoracic surgeon with MountainView Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Associates, will perform the first case on the da Vinci Xi on Friday, November 21. Dr. Chung is the only thoracic surgeon in Las Vegas utilizing the da Vinci Surgical Systems.

“This is a significant investment by MountainView Hospital into the health of our community,” said Dr. Chung. “The da Vinci Xi is the next step in minimally invasive surgical technology and will allow us to perform more complex procedures across an array of disciplines.”

The da Vinci Xi has broader capabilities than prior generations of the da Vinci Xi system, and has the ability to be used for thoracic, colorectal, gynecological and general surgery. Minimally invasive surgery allows for a quicker recovery time, less pain, less bleeding and shorter hospitalization.

The Xi possesses 3D-HD visualization, giving surgeons a highly magnified view. The da Vinci Xi system’s new overhead arm architecture provides the surgeon anatomical access from virtually any position, simplifying multi-quadrant surgeries. Smaller, thinner arms coupled with longer instrument shafts permit greater range of motion and more flexibility than ever before.

MountainView continues to be the leader in robotic surgery, offering an extensive panel of surgeons and pairing them with trained staff and nurses, who are part of dedicated robotic surgical teams. The da Vinci Xi joins MountainView’s two da Vinci Si robotic systems which will continue to be available as an advanced, minimally-invasive surgical option for patients.

MountainView offers many different types of robotically assisted procedures including ear, nose and throat (ENT), gynecological, fertility and gynecological oncology, urogynecological, urology, thoracic, colorectal and general surgery including single-site gallbladder surgery. For a full list of procedures performed by the Las Vegas Institute for Robotic Surgery, please visit: www.LVIRS.com. To find a physician who practices at MountainView’s Las Vegas Institute for Robotic Surgery, please call (702) 233-5474.

Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican’s Siena Campus Earns ‘Top Performer on Key Quality Measures®’ Recognition from The Joint Commission

Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican today announced its Siena campus has been recognized as a 2013 Top Performer on Key Quality Measures® by The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of health care organizations in the United States. The Siena campus was recognized as part of The Joint Commission’s 2014 annual report “America’s Hospitals: Improving Quality and Safety,” for attaining and sustaining excellence in accountability measure performance for (insert applicable measure set(s) for which your hospital was recognized). The Siena campus is one of 1,224 hospitals in the United States to achieve the 2013 Top Performer distinction.

The Top Performer program recognizes hospitals for improving performance on evidence-based interventions that increase the chances of healthy outcomes for patients with certain conditions, including heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, surgical care, children’s asthma, stroke, venous thromboembolism and perinatal care, as well as for inpatient psychiatric services and immunizations.

To be a 2013 Top Performer, hospitals had to meet three performance criteria based on 2013 accountability measure data, including:

  • Achieving cumulative performance of 95 percent or above across all reported accountability measures;
  • Achieving performance of 95 percent or above on each and every reported accountability measure where there were at least 30 denominator cases; and
  • Having at least one core measure set that had a composite rate of 95 percent or above, and (within that measure set) all applicable individual accountability measures had a performance rate of 95 percent or above.

“Delivering the right treatment in the right way at the right time is a cornerstone of high-quality health care. I commend the efforts of St. Rose for their excellent performance on the use of evidence-based interventions,” said Mark R. Chassin, M.D., FACP, M.P.P., M.P.H., president and CEO, The Joint Commission.

“We understand what matters most to patients at St. Rose is the quality and safety of the care they receive. That is why we have made it a top priority to improve positive patient outcomes through evidence-based care processes,” said Rod Davis, senior vice president of operations, Dignity Health Nevada. “Our Siena campus is proud to be named a Top Performer as it recognizes the knowledge, teamwork and dedication of our entire hospital staff.”

For more information about the Top Performer program, visit: http://www.jointcommission.org/accreditation/top_performers.aspx.

 

Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican Is the Best Performing System in Southern Nevada

Leapfrog Group
Henderson, NV –
 The Leapfrog Group has announced its hospital safety scores for all eligible hospitals in the U.S., and Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican’s, Rose de Lima Campus was one of two hospitals in southern Nevada to receive an A. Additionally, the St. Rose hospital system (Rose de Lima, San Martín and Siena Campuses) was the best-performing system in southern Nevada. Participation in the Leapfrog survey is voluntary, and all three St. Rose hospitals, along with more than 2,600 other hospitals nationwide, participated.

The Leapfrog Group, a national nonprofit organization that uses the collective leverage of large purchasers of health care to initiate breakthrough improvements in the safety, quality, and affordability of health care for Americans, converted numerical safety score data into letter grades from A to F, with an A denoting the best safety performance. Scores for each St. Rose campus are: Rose de Lima Campus, A; San Martín Campus, B; and Siena Campus, C. Of the 2,520 hospitals issued a Hospital Safety Score, 790 earned an “A,” 688 earned a “B,” 868 earned a “C,” 148 earned a “D” and 26 earned an “F.”

“We applaud the efforts of our medical staff and employees,” said Rod Davis, senior vice president of operations, Dignity Health Nevada. “They work, in partnership with our patients, visitors and community, to consistently and constantly improve the safety and quality of the care we provide.”

Patient care and safety continue to be our highest priorities at St. Rose. We are committed to ensuring access to safe, quality patient care and continue to demonstrate this commitment to improving and enhancing patient safety by adopting best practice guidelines recommended by national health care quality organizations such as the National Quality Forum and The Joint Commission. By working in partnership with our patients, our visitors and our community, we are constantly improving the safety and quality of patient care for all.

About Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican

As the community’s only not-for-profit, religiously sponsored hospital system, Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican has been guided by the vision and core values of the Adrian Dominican Sisters for more than 65 years. As the Henderson and Las Vegas communities grow, the three Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican hospitals (the Rose de Lima, Siena and San Martín Campuses) and their more than 3,400 employees will continue the Sisters’ mission of serving people in need. Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican is a member of the Dignity Health network of more than 300 care centers, including hospitals, urgent and occupational care, imaging centers, home health and primary care clinics. For more information, visit our website at www.strosehospitals.org or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or our Blog.

Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican Wins Las Vegas Consumer Choice Award

St. Rose Dominican Hospital - Siena CampusDignity Health-St. Rose Dominican, Siena Campus is this year’s award winner of the 2014-15 Consumer Choice Award for southern Nevada, as announced in the Oct. 13 issue of Modern Healthcare magazine. This award is given annually by the National Research Corporation to the hospital that consumers rank as best in overall quality and image. This prestigious award indicates that the Siena campus has reached a level of service that is highly valued by consumers in its market. It also provides consumers with useful information when selecting a hospital as a place to receive care.

“We applaud the efforts of our medical staff and employees,” said Rod Davis, senior vice president of operations, Dignity Health Nevada. “They work, in partnership with our patients, visitors and community, to consistently and constantly improve the safety and quality of the care we provide.”

Winners are determined by consumer perceptions on multiple quality and image ratings collected in the company’s Market Insights survey, the largest online consumer health care survey in the country. National Research surveys more than 290,000 households in the contiguous 48 states and the District of Columbia. Hospitals named by consumers are analyzed and ranked based on Core Based Statistical Areas defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, with winning facilities being ranked the highest. This is the 19th anniversary of the Consumer Choice Award and its popularity continues to rise.

“The complexity of health care has urged consumers to play much more of an integral role in their care decisions, which in turn, is prompting hospitals and health care systems to lead a proactive approach to brand awareness,” said Brian Wynne, Vice President of Sales at National Research. “This year’s winners have done an exceptional job of representing their organizations in terms of high-quality care, improvement initiatives, and positive consumer perceptions and experiences.”

About National Research Corporation
For more than 30 years, National Research Corporation (NASDAQ: NRCIA and NRCIB) has been at the forefront of patient-centered care. Today, the company’s focus on empowering customer-centric health care across the continuum extends patient-centered care to incorporate families, communities, employees, senior housing residents, and other stakeholders. Recognized by Modern Healthcare as the largest patient satisfaction firm in the United States, National Research is dedicated to representing the true voice of patients and other health care stakeholders. This integration of cross-continuum metrics and analytics uncovers insights for effective performance improvement, quality measurement, care transitions, and many other factors that impact population health management. National Research is headquartered in Lincoln, Nebraska. For more information, call 800-388-4264, write to info@nationalresearch.com, or visit www.nationalresearch.com.

About Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican

As the community’s only not-for-profit, religiously sponsored hospital system, Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican has been guided by the vision and core values of the Adrian Dominican Sisters for more than 65 years. As the Henderson and Las Vegas communities grow, the three Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican hospitals (the Rose de Lima, Siena and San Martín Campuses) and their more than 3,400 employees will continue the Sisters’ mission of serving people in need. Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican is a member of the Dignity Health network of more than 300 care centers, including hospitals, urgent and occupational care, imaging centers, home health and primary care clinics. For more information, visit our website at www.strosehospitals.org or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or our Blog.

Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican Sister Blesses Emergency Medical Services Personnel, Ambulances, Helicopters and Fire Trucks

Dozens of emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, along with their ambulances, helicopters and fire trucks, were blessed by Sr. Mary Kieffer, OP, this afternoon at the Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican San Martín campus. The event coincided with the Feast of Saint Michael on Sept. 29. Saint Michael is the patron saint of all those who defend the community, including paramedics and EMTs. The event included lunch and the gift of a Saint Michael medallion for first responders. The blessing was non-denominational and open to all faiths.

st rose blessing“We partner every day with EMS workers to make sure our patients get the care they need at the time they most need it,” said Kieffer, vice president of mission integration at Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican, San Martin. “We wanted to take the day of the Feast of Saint Michael to thank our partners for their work, break bread and bless these special people who save lives every day.”
A long tradition identifies Saint Michael the Archangel as the leader who remained faithful to God and cast out Lucifer at God’s command. His powerful aid has always been invoked by the Catholic Church in time of emergency. The Popes have constantly called on Saint Michael as the special protector of the Church whenever great evils threatened God’s people. For this reason, Saint Michael is especially honored at Rome, on Monte Gargano, near Foggia, in Italy, and in France on Mont Saint Michel in Normandy. The Feast of Saint Michael is also known as Michaelmas.

About Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican

As the community’s only not-for-profit, religiously sponsored hospital system, Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican has been guided by the vision and core values of the Adrian Dominican Sisters for more than 65 years. As the Henderson and Las Vegas communities grow, the three St. Rose Dominican hospitals (the Rose de Lima, Siena and San Martín Campuses) and more than 3,400 employees will continue the Sisters’ mission of serving people in need. St. Rose Dominican is a member of the 21-state Dignity Health network of nearly 11,000 physicians, 56,000 employees, and more than 300 care centers, including hospitals, urgent and occupational care, imaging centers, home health, and primary care clinics. For more information, visit our website at www.strosehospitals.org or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or our Blog.

UNLV Formally Begins Accreditation Process for School of Medicine

The UNLV School of Medicine has formally submitted its application to start the process for accreditation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), planning dean Dr. Barbara Atkinson announced Monday.

The LCME is the accrediting body for all allopathic (M.D.-granting) schools of medicine in the U.S. and Canada and ensures that member schools meet national standards for educational quality. The UNLV School of Medicine will now be listed as an applicant, pre-accredited M.D. program on the LCME website, which keeps track of where schools are in the accreditation process. The school anticipates a Fall 2017 inaugural entering class.

unlv“Starting the accreditation process is a very important step as it further signifies UNLV’s commitment to creating a top medical school that will meet the health care needs of Southern Nevadans,” said UNLV President Donald Snyder. “Creating a UNLV School of Medicine is a top priority for UNLV, and I’m encouraged by the energy and support of our board of regents and chancellor, our campus and the area medical community.”

The Nevada System of Higher Education Board of Regents recently approved the inclusion of $26.7 million in startup funds for the school in its biennial state budget request for the 2015 Nevada Legislative Session. Concurrently, Atkinson and university officials are developing educational programming, recruiting faculty, identifying possible locations and working to obtain private support for program development and for facility construction. Atkinson hopes to admit an inaugural class of 60 students by Fall 2017 with expansion to 120 students within four years of the school’s opening.

“Accreditation is a long term process that will continue well after we’ve welcomed our first class, but this is an important step and continues our positive momentum,” said Atkinson, who began as planning dean in May to guide the school through its development and accreditation process. “Our region needs the access to high quality healthcare that will come with the programs, faculty and graduates of the UNLV School of Medicine.”

An immediate local impact is expected with the recruitment of medical school faculty, who will bring their own clinical practice in needed specialty areas in addition to creating research programs and residency opportunities.

“At the Nevada System of Higher Education, we believe we can play an important role in helping to improve access to high-quality health care in Nevada through the expansion of Nevada’s public medical education programs, which includes a UNLV School of Medicine,” said Kevin Page, chair of the Nevada System of Higher Education Board of Regents. “Close to 80 percent of students who complete medical school and graduate medical education in the same state will stay to live and practice in that state, and we have been working diligently over the past year to develop a coordinated and comprehensive plan for expanding public medical education throughout Nevada.”

The vision for the UNLV School of Medicine is to create an urban academic health center that will address the health needs of the region and build on areas of existing strength within the university.

The school will teach a diverse group of future Nevada doctors how to work in healthcare teams, apply new technology, and develop treatment solutions for diseases of the present and future. It will serve the community and work collaboratively with local healthcare institutions and professionals to enhance clinical care for all citizens while also developing research programs aimed at preventing, treating and curing diseases.  The UNLV School of Medicine will integrate public undergraduate medical education and graduate medical education – or residencies – to cultivate more doctors staying to serve Southern Nevada.

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Switch SUPERNAP and Intel Partner with UNLV to Boost Scientific Research and Economic Development

Tech industry leaders Switch SUPERNAP and Intel are working together with UNLV to bring one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers to Las Vegas. UNLV was recently awarded the use of the Intel “Cherry Creek” supercomputer, which ranks among the world’s fastest and most powerful supercomputers for its combination of speed, power, and energy efficiency. Housed in Switch’s Las Vegas SUPERNAP data center and available to UNLV researchers through SUPERNAP’s unique connectivity network, the “Cherry Creek” supercomputer gives the university and its research partners access to world-class computing power and will act as a catalyst for scientific discovery, the modernization of applications, and regional economic development efforts.

SUPERNAP_CherryCreek_2

Complicated analyses that once took years can now be completed in days, advancing fields such as genomics and bioinformatics, medical and climate research, molecular modeling, and data analytics. Thanks to its placement at the Switch SUPERNAP, Cherry Creek will allow UNLV researchers to share data with collaborators across the globe.

“Supercomputers have become an indispensable part of almost every industry. For university researchers, they’ve increased the speed of analysis and discovery exponentially,” said UNLV President Donald Snyder. “Working together with Intel and Switch, UNLV has a tremendous opportunity not only to keep pace with but to play a leading role in big data research and economic development partnerships that require high-performance computing.”

The companies will also encourage public-private interactions to accelerate innovation and advance regional economic development. Private companies need access to the high-level computing power of supercomputers and the expertise of the UNLV team that uses them, so a portion of the computer’s space will be reserved for private sector investment in university research through partnerships with UNLV and Switch SUPERNAP.

“Cherry Creek was the first Top 500 class supercomputer featured at a supercomputing event, showcasing the efforts by Intel and our partners in driving unprecedented efficiency gains and accessibility that were not previously possible,” said Hugo Saleh, Director of Marketing and Industry Development, Intel Technical Computing Group. “These benefits are achieved using the combination of generally available Xeon processors, Xeon Phi Coprocessors, and True Scale Fabric which enable efficient application scaling. We are excited to embark on this partnership with Switch and UNLV and look forward to the advancements in code parallelization and the groundbreaking scientific results that will be achieved.”

In addition to research and private collaborations, Intel experts will also engage with students in IT-related fields through guest lectures and academic programming, helping UNLV graduates to compete in the evolving tech industry.

“The SUPERNAP executive team is pleased to be donating the services to UNLV for this effort. We understand how important this scientific research will be for economic development in the region,” said Rob Roy, CEO and Founder of Switch SUPERNAP. “The SUPERNAP ecosystem will accelerate the development of new technology and provide the necessary industry relationships to advance UNLV’s efforts.”

Cherry Creek is a welcome addition to the strong computing arsenal of UNLV’s National Supercomputing Center for Energy and the Environment (NSCEE), a full-service facility founded in 1991 that supports researchers on campus and across the nation. UNLV staff will maintain and optimize Cherry Creek, schedule time and use for UNLV and partner researchers, and will work closely with technical experts from Intel and Switch SUPERNAP to update the supercomputer as new technology becomes available.

“Having access to this technology will enhance and expand UNLV’s current research programs and will act as a catalyst for new emerging research interests such as big data analytics,” said Joseph Lombardo, Executive Director of NSCEE. “Additionally, having this special resource will enhance the educational experience for a diverse set of top-quality graduate and undergraduate students while playing an important role in faculty recruitment.”

Click here for a video with more information.

About Cherry Creek

Developed in conjunction with and support from Bright Computing, CoolIT Systems, Intel, Micron Technology, and Supermicro, Cherry Creek is capable of processing data roughly seven times faster than UNLV’s supercomputing center currently allows. Speed in supercomputing is measured in floating-point operations per second (FLOPS). Originally shown at the Supercomputing 2013 conference, Intel Cherry Creek delivers 131.5 TFLOPS at only 74kW of power, which placed it 400th on the November Top500 list and 41st on the Green500 rankings of the world’s most energy efficient supercomputers at that time.

Technical Details

48 node cluster in two racks comprised of 12 Supermicro FatTwin Server Solutions with 48 2U half-width nodes.

Each node comprised of:

  • Dual Intel® Xeon® E5-2697v2
  • Three Intel® Xeon Phi™ Coprocessor 7120P
  • Intel® Solid-State Drives DC S3700 Series
  • Intel® True Scale Fabric Host Channel Adapter 7340
  • 128GB Micron DDR3 memory

Linpack Performance (Rmax): 131.5 TFLOPS
Theoretical Peak (Rpeak): 198.8 TFLOPS
Power: 74.00 kW
Operating System: Redhat Enterprise Linux 6
Compiler: Intel Composer XE 2013
Math Library: Intel MKL
MPI: Intel MPI

###

UNLV is a doctoral-degree-granting institution of more than 27,000 students and 2,900 faculty and staff. Founded in 1957, the university offers more than 220 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral degree programs. UNLV is located on a 332-acre campus in dynamic Southern Nevada and is classified in the category of Research Universities (high research activity) by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

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Summerlin Hospital Medical Center and Primary Children’s Hospital of Salt Lake City Enter into an Affiliation Agreement

Summerlin Hospital Medical Center and Primary Children’s Hospital of Salt Lake City are pleased to announce that they have entered into a collaborative partnership to enhance the quality of care and service provided to pediatric patients here in Las Vegas, Nevada.

SH_Peds-logo-4c

“We are very excited about our new relationship and the opportunity to partner with the highly-respected Primary Children’s Hospital,” said Robert Freymuller, CEO of Summerlin Hospital, which is located in Las Vegas, Nevada. “This enables our patients, families, physicians and hospital staff to benefit from the research, expertise and experience that Primary Children’s Hospital possesses.”

Intermountain_Healthcare_Primary_Children's_Medical_Center_logo.svg“Primary Children’s is thrilled to be working with the Summerlin Hospital Medical Center team” says Katy Welkie, CEO of Primary Children’s Hospital. “Our hospital motto, The Child First and Always, speaks to the kind of dedication our team brings to the care, comfort and safety of all the children we serve.”

“Even though we are well equipped to handle the majority of complex pediatric cases, there are some advanced services not available in Las Vegas. Our association with Primary Children’s Hospital provides easier access to a variety of medical specialists based in Utah that will be accessed in some cases through innovative technology such as telemedicine consultations. Overall, this relationship with a major pediatric tertiary care hospital like Primary Children’s is a significant benefit to our patients and our community,” said Freymuller.

“Being able to help provide advanced pediatric treatment to the families of the Las Vegas area doesn’t just involve treating patients at Primary Children’s,” adds Welkie. “It means providing the kind of staff training, access to research and consultation services that will benefit patients and families at Summerlin for decades to come. It is a partnership that strengthens both communities”.

Key advantages of the affiliation include:

  • Enhanced access to advanced tertiary/quaternary services not provided in Southern Nevada
  • Access to more specialists, either in-person or via telemedicine consultations
  • Access to new treatment protocols for pediatric patients
  • Integration of electronic medical records, offering physicians a clearer view of the pediatric patients’ overall medical situation
  • Improved and more coordinated process to easily transfer pediatric patients to Primary Children’s Hospital for advanced medical care and return home to Las Vegas for ongoing treatment or monitoring
  • Enhanced coordination of care between multiple hospitals and physicians
  • Ability to care for Primary Children’s Hospital patients who may be traveling to Las Vegas
  • Access to continuing medical education for Summerlin Hospital physicians and nursing staff
  • Access to advanced pediatric medicine research

The Children’s Medical Center at Summerlin Hospital is a specialized pediatric program housed within Summerlin Hospital, a 454-bed tertiary care facility in Las Vegas. The hospital provides a wide range of health care services including comprehensive women’s and maternity services, advanced cardiovascular care, surgical services, oncology, orthopedic and spine care along with acute rehabilitation. The Children’s Medical Center at Summerlin is dedicated to the diagnosis, intervention and treatment of children. The Children’s Medical Center offers a dedicated pediatric ER, PICU, neonatal ICU, specialized surgery, inpatient unit, and outpatient physical therapy center. It is a member of The Valley Health System and is the pediatric hospital rotation site for Valley Hospital’s graduate medical education program.

Primary Children’s Hospital is a free-standing children’s hospital located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Our 289-bed hospital cares for children with complex illness and injury from across the western United States. Primary Children’s is the only Level I Pediatric Trauma Center serving the intermountain region. Our hospital is part of Intermountain Healthcare, a non-profit healthcare system, and is the pediatric teaching hospital for the University of Utah School of Medicine.

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