Southern Hills Hospital Announces Stephanie Miller as Assistant Administrator

Southern Hills Hospital is proud to announce the promotion of Stephanie Miller to Assistant Administrator, effective immediately. As the Assistant Administrator, Miller oversees day-to-day operations of the Environmental Services, Dietary, Imaging, Linen, Pharmacy, Laboratory, Respiratory Therapy and Physical Medicine, as well as is the Ethics & Compliance Officer (ECO) for the hospital.

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Southern Hills Hospital  is proud to provide our employees the professional growth and development that are critical in any organization,” said Kimball Anderson, CEO of Southern Hills Hospital & Medical Center. “With Stephanie Miller’s knowledge and experience, I look forward to seeing her thrive as a hospital administrator.”

“I am grateful for this opportunity at Southern Hills Hospital,” said Stephanie Miller, Assistant Administrator. “I am excited to work with our team in this role to consistently find ways to improve the quality of healthcare in our community.”

Miller was Southern Hills’ Director of Laboratory, Respiratory Therapy and Physical Medicine since 2006, and was the Chief Technologist before that time. Miller is an inaugural member of the Southern Hills Hospital team when it opened in 2004.

Miller earned her Master of Business Administration in 2002 and her bachelor’s in Molecular Biology and Medical Technology from the University of Wyoming in 1995. She is a published co-author of Cycle DNA Sequencing from a Gel Band that was released in “Biotechniques” in 1995.

To learn more about the hospital and its services, visit SouthernHillsHospital.com.

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Robert Pretzlaff, M.D., named Chief Medical Officer of Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican

Robert Pretzlaff, M.D. has been selected as Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican’s chief medical officer, providing oversight of the medical staff functions at three hospitals. Dr. Pretzlaff has served in many healthcare leadership roles, most recently as the Associate Director, UC Davis Health System faculty practice group, and as Chief of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine at the UC Davis School of Medicine in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining St. Rose, Dr. Pretzlaff was instrumental in developing a partnership with Dignity Health to create a Pediatric Hospitalist Program.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIn addition to a master’s degree in business administration from California State University – Sacramento, Dr. Pretzlaff holds a M.D. from Wayne State University School of Medicine, a master’s degree in biology from Wayne State University and a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Michigan State University. Dr. Pretzlaff completed his pediatric residency at the University of Michigan and his pediatric critical care fellowship at the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC at the National Institutes of Health.

“Dr. Pretzlaff is a very accomplished physician, teacher, leader, and mentor, and we at St. Rose feel he is the perfect fit for this position,” said Rod Davis, senior vice president of operations for Dignity Health Nevada. “We are so pleased that he is onboard.”

Dr. Pretzlaff worked for many years at an academic medical center and most recently focused his research on medical decisionmaking in the critical-care environment and communication between providers and patients.  Clinically, his interests include the use of extracorporeal life support and improving the quality and safety of patient care.  In recent years, Dr. Pretzlaff has taken on increasing leadership roles and earned his MBA. “My career has progressed in a way where I feel that physicians need to take an active role in improving the ways in which we deliver care, and becoming the CMO for St. Rose is a great way to do that,” said Dr. Pretzlaff.

About Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican

As the community’s only not-for-profit, religiously sponsored hospital system, Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican has been guided by the vision and core values of the Adrian Dominican Sisters for more than 65 years. As the Henderson and Las Vegas communities grow, the three St. Rose Dominican hospitals (the Rose de Lima, Siena and San Martín Campuses) and more than 3,400 employees will continue the Sisters’ mission of serving people in need. St. Rose Dominican is a member of the 21-state Dignity Health network of nearly 11,000 physicians, 56,000 employees, and more than 300 care centers, including hospitals, urgent and occupational care, imaging centers, home health, and primary care clinics. For more information, visit our website at www.strosehospitals.org or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or our Blog.

 

Christopher Mercado, M.D., family medicine physician, to provide care for Dignity Health Medical Group patients

Dignity Health Medical Group (DHMG), affiliated with the Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican hospital system, welcomes Dr. Christopher Mercado to practice at its southwest location.  The primary care clinic is located at 7190 S. Cimarron Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89113 and is currently accepting new and returning patients with most insurance accepted.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA graduate from the University of Nevada, School of Medicine, Dr. Mercado is a board-eligible family medicine physician.  Mercado is a member of the American Academy of Family Physicians and Nevada Academy of Family Physicians.

“The physicians who care for Dignity Health Medical Group patients share the vision of treating patients the way they would want their own loved ones treated,” said Stephen Jones, MD, Chief Physician Executive for Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican, “so they do their best to ensure that each patient experience is warm and friendly, with a touch of humankindness. We are pleased to have Dr. Mercado serving patients at our clinic.”

The doctors at the Dignity Health Medical Group clinics are currently comprised of internal medicine, family practice and pediatric physicians, as well as two specialized pediatric endocrinologists. The credentials of all of these individuals reflect a tremendous depth of professional experience. For services not offered by Dignity Health Medical Group, the physicians have formed strong working relationships with local specialists, ensuring patients receive the best possible care at all times.Internal medicine physicians diagnose and treat common health problems, coordinate medical care for patients, manage medications, promote healthy lifestyles and focus on disease prevention.

Dignity Health Medical Group offers same-day appointments at its three clinic locations.  For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 616-5801 or visit www.dhmgnv.com.

Elham Taherian, M.D., Adult Rheumatology Physician, to Provide Care for Dignity Health Medical Group Patients

Dignity Health Medical Group (DHMG), affiliated with the Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican hospital system, welcomes Dr. Elham Taherian to practice at its northwest location.  The primary care clinic is located at 8689 W. Charleston Blvd., Suite 105 and is currently accepting new and returning patients, with most insurance accepted.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADr. Taherian is a board-certified rheumatology physician.  Taherian did her residency through the University of Nevada School of Medicine and her fellowship at Case Medical Center in Cleveland, OH. Dr. Taherian was previously an assistant professor at the University of Nevada School of Medicine, teaching residents and medical students.

“The physicians who care for Dignity Health Medical Group patients share the vision of treating patients the way they would want their own loved ones treated,” said Stephen Jones, MD, Chief Physician Executive for Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican, “so they do their best to ensure that each patient experience is warm and friendly, with a touch of humankindness. We are pleased to have Dr. Taherian serving patients at our clinic.”

The doctors at the Dignity Health Medical Group clinics are currently comprised of internal medicine, family practice and pediatric physicians, as well as two pediatric endocrinologists. The credentials of all of these individuals reflect a tremendous depth of professional experience. For services not offered by Dignity Health Medical Group, the physicians have formed strong working relationships with local specialists, ensuring patients receive the best possible care at all times.Internal medicine physicians diagnose and treat common health problems, coordinate medical care for patients, manage medications, promote healthy lifestyles and focus on disease prevention.

Dignity Health Medical Group offers same-day appointments at its three clinic locations.  For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 616-5801 or visit www.dhmgnv.com.

Susan Ritter, M.D., Family Practice Physician With Focus in Integrative Medicine, to Provide Care for Dignity Health Medical Group Patients

Dignity Health Medical Group (DHMG), affiliated with the Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican hospital system, welcomes Dr. Susan Ritter to practice at its Henderson location.  The primary care clinic is located at 10001 S. Eastern Avenue, Suite 203 and is currently accepting new and returning patients with most insurance accepted.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA graduate from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Dr. Ritter is a board-certified family practice physician.  Ritter did both her residency and fellowship through the University of Arizona. Dr. Ritter will complete a two-year fellowship in January with the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, under the direction of Andrew Weil, MD, with a focus on enhanced knowledge and skills in nutritional health, botanicals and dietary supplements, mind-body medicine, and complementary and alternative practices.

“The physicians who care for Dignity Health Medical Group patients share the vision of treating patients the way they would want their own loved ones treated,” said Stephen Jones, MD, Chief Physician Executive for Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican, “so they do their best to ensure that each patient experience is warm and friendly, with a touch of humankindness. We are pleased to have Dr. Ritter serving patients at our clinic.”

The doctors at the Dignity Health Medical Group clinics are currently comprised of internal medicine, family practice and pediatric physicians, as well as two specialized pediatric endocrinologists. The credentials of all of these individuals reflect a tremendous depth of professional experience. For services not offered by Dignity Health Medical Group, the physicians have formed strong working relationships with local specialists, ensuring patients receive the best possible care at all times.Internal medicine physicians diagnose and treat common health problems, coordinate medical care for patients, manage medications, promote healthy lifestyles and focus on disease prevention.

Dignity Health Medical Group offers same-day appointments at its three clinic locations.  For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 616-5801 or visit www.dhmgnv.com.

UNLV School of Nursing, Valley Health System Expand Dedicated Education Unit Program

Students get enhanced clinical training through focused learning with staff nurses and lower instructor-to-student ratio. Partnership began at Summerlin Hospital in 2012, expands to Spring Valley Hospital this fall.

UNLV School of Nursing students will gain clinical experience working in The Valley Health System hospitals. (Geri Kodey/UNLV Photo Services)

UNLV School of Nursing students will gain clinical experience working in The Valley Health System hospitals. (Geri Kodey/UNLV Photo Services)

Students at the UNLV School of Nursing will have more opportunities for hands-on clinical experiences this fall when The Valley Health System expands the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) program to a second hospital.

Students in the DEU program partner with dedicated staff nurses each semester and assist in caring for the nurses’ assigned patients. Unlike other clinical programs that have instructor-to-student ratios of one to eight or more, the staff nurses in the DEU mentor one to two students.

The UNLV School of Nursing and The Valley Health System opened the first DEU in Southern Nevada during spring 2012 at Summerlin Hospital. The second will open this fall at Spring Valley Hospital. These are the only DEUs in the state and both are available to UNLV students only.

The UNLV nursing program comprises four semesters of 15 consecutive weeks. Students in their second and third semesters spend one 12-hour shift in the DEU every other week. Students in their fourth semester may spend as many as three 12-hours shifts each week. School of Nursing faculty work with the staff nurses in the DEU to ensure the students receive the appropriate level of instruction and training.

In addition to opening the new unit, The Valley Health System made a three-year gift to the university that will help the School of Nursing hire one full-time faculty member who will focus on the DEU.

“Our partnership with The Valley Health System made the DEU a reality and helps better prepare future nurses for their profession,” said Carolyn Yucha, dean of the School of Nursing. “Staff nurses appreciate the assistance and the opportunity to ready students for the realities of health care, which translates to enhanced attention for current and future patients.”

The DEU program also provides hiring managers with a first look at prospective employees, and nurse leaders within the hospitals are able to recommend updates or improvements to our curriculum, Yucha added.

Karla Perez, vice president of Acute Division for United Health Services, Inc., which owns The Valley Health System, also appreciates the benefits of the DEU model.

“We see multiple benefits with our UNLV partnership,” Perez said. “Nurses are considered the backbone of a hospital and the DEU gives students an opportunity to hone their clinical skills, understand the needs of patients and families, and learn the dynamics of working in a hospital. The opportunity to work directly with staff nurses and interact with other health care professionals such as physicians, physical, occupational and speech therapists, respiratory therapists, lab techs, and dieticians is invaluable.”

More than 250 nursing students, representing more than 25,000 hours of direct patient care education, have refined their skills in the DEU since it opened.

###UNLV is a doctoral-degree-granting institution of more than 27,000 students and 2,900 faculty and staff. Founded in 1957, the university offers more than 220 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral degree programs. UNLV is located on a 332-acre campus in dynamic Southern Nevada and is classified in the category of Research Universities (high research activity) by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

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Stanford School of Medicine Clinical Faculty Member and Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgeon, Ashraf Osman Joins St. Rose-Stanford Clinics

Ashraf Osman, MD, FACS, FICS, FCCP, a cardiovascular and thoracic surgeon and clinical assistant professor at Stanford University, has joined the St. Rose-Stanford Clinics Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery program. Osman is double board-certified in cardiothoracic surgery and general surgery, and in addition to caring for patients in a clinical setting, he is also on the faculty of Stanford’s Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery. Dr. Osman is the fifth Stanford full-time faculty physician to join the St. Rose-Stanford Clinics.

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Dr. Osman’s interests cover a broad spectrum of adult cardiac surgery procedures including valve repairs and replacement, coronary artery bypass grafting and lung surgery, including the VATS (video assisted thorascopic surgery) approach. Osman is also a member of Stanford’s Heart Transplant Program, and has a special interest in caring for Las Vegas-area potential heart-transplant patients before and after a transplant procedure at Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto, California. Stanford University performed the first successful heart transplant in the United States in 1968. Stanford is also a leader in introducing new concepts and treatments to improve patient outcomes.

“Dr. Osman is an incredibly knowledgeable, experienced and accomplished surgeon and academician,” said Rod Davis, senior vice president of operations, Dignity Health Nevada. “The level of care he brings to the St. Rose-Stanford Clinics and the Las Vegas valley is highly impressive. We are pleased that he can provide those in our region who may need a heart transplant with a portion of their pre- and post-surgical care closer to home, as well as provide open heart surgical procedures at local hospitals, including valve repairs, bypass surgery and ventricular-assistive devices.”

Dr. Osman holds a Doctor of Medicine from Cairo University and served his residencies and fellowships at places like The Cleveland Clinic, Boston University Medical Center, Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA and Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA.

Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican and Stanford Hospital and Clinics formed an affiliation in fall 2011 when the St. Rose-Stanford Neurosurgery Clinic opened at the Siena Campus. The affiliation with Stanford Hospital and Clinics marked the first time the well-known medical institution ventured outside California for a clinical collaboration. The neurosurgery clinic now has two full-time Stanford clinical faculty, and was joined by the addition of the cardiovascular and thoracic surgery clinic in 2013. The partnership combines the high levels of quality and community trust already established at Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican with the world-renowned expertise of Stanford.

Dr. Osman is accepting new patients. For a referral, ask your physician or call 702-616-6580.

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Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals Collaborates with Beasley Broadcasting for Fourth Annual Radiothon

Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, a nonprofit organization whose local proceeds benefit Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican’s pediatric departments, is holding its fourth annual two-day radiothon with Beasley Broadcasting’s AM 720 KDWN, 102.7 The Coyote and 96.3 KKLZ Friday, August 8, 2014, through Saturday, August 9, 2014. The public can call 888-499-KIDS to make a pledge.

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“Three Beasley Broadcasting radio stations will be broadcasting live from Town Square Las Vegas throughout the fundraising event,” said Charlie Guida, president, St. Rose Dominican Health Foundation. “Families will tell their miracle stories, and we’ll have special guests. Our goal is to have members of the community call in pledges and contribute. Donations can be made by credit card, check, online, cash – even spare change. Every donation makes a difference by ensuring that sick children in our community get the medical treatment – and special attention – they need.”

In southern Nevada, 100 percent of every dollar raised by Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals in our community goes to St. Rose’s pediatric centers to provide state-of-the art treatment and care, specialized pediatric medical equipment, health education, and charity care to those families who are most in need.

About Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals

Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals is a nonprofit organization dedicated to saving and improving the lives of children by raising funds for children’s hospitals. Each year, the 170 Children’s Miracle Network hospitals provide the finest medical care, life-saving research and preventative education to help millions of kids overcome diseases and injuries of every kind. Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican partnered with Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals in January 2005. Since then, 100 percent of every dollar raised in southern Nevada goes to St. Rose’s pediatric centers to provide state-of-the art treatment and care, specialized pediatric medical equipment, health education, and charity care to those families who are most in need.

About Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican

As the community’s only not-for-profit, religiously sponsored hospital system, Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican has been guided by the vision and core values of the Adrian Dominican Sisters for more than 65 years. As the Henderson and Las Vegas communities grow, the three St. Rose Dominican hospitals (the Rose de Lima, Siena and San Martín Campuses) and more than 3,400 employees will continue the Sisters’ mission of serving people in need. St. Rose Dominican is a member of the 21-state Dignity Health network of nearly 11,000 physicians, 56,000 employees, and more than 300 care centers, including hospitals, urgent and occupational care, imaging centers, home health, and primary care clinics. For more information, visit our website at www.strosehospitals.org or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or our Blog.

 

UNLV engineering professors and students use 3-D printer to create Robohand for 4-year-old child

One Las Vegas mother might have changed the course of her 4-year-old daughter Hailey’s life with an email to the Howard R. Hughes College of Engineering. Hailey Dawson was born with Poland syndrome, a rare birth defect that causes underdevelopment of the pectoral muscle on one side of the body and deformation of the hand. The syndrome caused her hand to form with only a thumb and a pinky and nubbins in place of the remaining fingers, resembling the “hang loose” sign. Hailey calls it her “special hand.” She doesn’t have the ability to grasp, which makes common childhood activities — such as riding a bicycle — difficult and unsafe.

After scouring the Internet, Hailey’s mother Yong Dawson stumbled upon Robohand - a cost-effective plastic prosthetic made in a 3-D printer and cobbled together with wire, nuts and bolts. Inspired by Robohand, Dawson contacted UNLV engineers, hoping that a researcher might take on the project.

UNLV Professor Brendan O'Toole, right, and Katherine Lau, an undergraduate intern from Rutgers University, middle right, join Yong Dawson, left, in helping to take measurements of Dawson's 4-year-old daughter Hailey Dawson in O'Toole's lab June 19, 2014 at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. (Aaron Mayes/UNLV Photo Services)

UNLV Professor Brendan O’Toole, right, and Katherine Lau, an undergraduate intern from Rutgers University, middle right, join Yong Dawson, left, in helping to take measurements of Dawson’s 4-year-old daughter Hailey Dawson in O’Toole’s lab June 19, 2014 at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. (Aaron Mayes/UNLV Photo Services)

“How could you say no to this?” said Brendan O’Toole, chair and professor of mechanical engineering. “The project combines mechanics, robotics, and we get the added bonus of helping someone. It could make all the difference in the world of making Hailey more comfortable or safe.”

The plans for the hand are free to the public, so any professional or aspiring engineer can download the design and tinker with it to fit their needs.  Nearly 200 people around the world are using the device, according to Robohand’s website. Thanks to the entrepreneurial spirit of O’Toole and Mohammed Trabia, associate dean for engineering research, and the ingenuity of a few engineering students, a plastic hand will soon be created for Hailey using UNLV’s 3-D printer.

Hailey Dawson closes her eyes as a laser scanner is used to make a 3D model of her deformed hand.

Hailey Dawson closes her eyes as a laser scanner is used to make a 3D model of her deformed hand.

When completed in the next few weeks, the Robohand will be strapped to Hailey’s hand and she’ll use the muscles in her wrist to control the plastic hand and contract its fingers. Hailey, like most kids with a Robohand, will need a new hand every year or two as she grows. Because the design is already in the system, engineers can easily scale up the design as she grows.

O’Toole estimates that printing and creating the hand could cost anywhere from $200 to $2,000, a cost that will be covered by UNLV. A prosthetic hand could cost $20,000 to $30,000.

Assisting O’Toole and Trabia on the team is Katherine Lau, a visiting undergraduate student researcher from Rutgers University and a graduate of Palo Verde High School in Las Vegas, who is studying with O’Toole this summer. UNLV engineering student Zack Cook and Claire Ong and Kareem Trabia, students from Advanced Technologies High School in Las Vegas, are learning about engineering at UNLV this summer and  are also participating.

CREATING THE MOLD

Earlier this summer, Hailey sat patiently in O’Toole’s lab so that Lau could take detailed measurements of her hands. Both of Hailey’s hands were placed into a bucket of plaster to create a mold, a process that involves staying perfectly still for at least a minute—not an easy task for an active kid who likes watching Disney’s Frozen, playing with beads and just learned how to whistle.

“I don’t think she really notices that her hand is different and she’s adapted very well,” Lau said. “She’s very proud of her hand and not afraid of it. But I think this will help safety-wise. She will ride a bike and do other two-handed things that are needed in life. It’s rewarding to be able to help her.”

Hailey’s mom, Lau and other researchers sang songs from The Lego Movie and helped Hailey count aloud to 60 to help her stay relaxed while the mold formed. Lau then took a laser scanner to obtain a 3-D image of both of Hailey’s arms. She also measured Hailey using traditional measuring tape.

“I love this because Hailey gets to be here and see the whole process,” said Hailey’s mom. “They get to know her, see what’s she’s like and see her personality.”

THE 3-D PRINTING PROCESS

First, engineers will use a 3-D computer modeling program called Solidworks. Then they will input all the measurements, tweak the design to suit Hailey, and send the electronic plans to UNLV’s 3-D printer.

Printing the hand will take less than one day.  The process of 3-D printing involves extruding layer upon layer of ABS plastic over the same area, building up a 3D composite. The ABS plastic hand will lined with orthoplastic – a moldable, breathable, washable and medically approved plastic for this use. Students will custom mold the hand to Hailey to limit the possibility of skin lesions, infection and injury.

UNLV’s mechanical engineering program often uses the 3-D printer to build prototypes for designs or to physically check if one of their designs will function. It’s also used to create products for the engineering college’s senior design competition, which showcases the inventions of undergraduate students.

O’Toole said he envisions his students working on capstone engineering projects focusing on upgrading the robotic hand designs that would add a mechanism for a greater gripping force or other robotic functions.

Hailey’s mother said she hopes this will encourage other families to seek out help for their children with Poland syndrome. She hopes to partner with the College of Engineering to create a foundation that will help kids receive new robotic hands.

Read original article from UNLV website here

Two UNLV School of Nursing Doctoral Students Named Jonas Scholars

UNLV School of Nursing named two of its doctoral students Jonas Nurse Leaders Scholars, supporting their pursuits of advanced nursing degrees and preparing them to help new students address the needs of future patients.

UNLV school of nursing photo

Students Maulah Adanri and Paul Smith will each receive $20,000 for their nursing studies during the next two years, making them part of a national effort to stem the nursing faculty shortage and prepare future nurses as America’s healthcare system continues to evolve.

The Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare awarded the School of Nursing $20,000 to support one PhD and one DNP Jonas Nurse Leader Scholar. The school matches the amount received to fund the scholarships. Adanri and Smith are the school’s third and fourth recipients.

Adanri is pursuing a DNP at UNLV. She is currently the manager of cardiac telemetry, progressive care, and the centralized monitoring center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. She is a certified Adult Health Clinical Nurse Specialist. She is interested in developing a mentor program for minority nursing students designed to prepare them for leadership roles.

Smith is pursuing a PhD in Nursing, nurse educator track, at UNLV.  He is currently an assistant professor of nursing at Linfield College in Portland, Oregon, where he teaches a variety of courses in traditional and online classrooms. His clinical specialties include adult health nursing and adult critical care with emphasis on neurological conditions. His research scholarship focuses on diversity, cultural competence, and health disparities seen in the LGBT community.

The Jonas Nurse Leaders Scholar Program supports more than 250 scholars in all 50 states. Adanri and Smith join nearly 600 future nurse educators and leaders at 110 schools supported by Jonas Center programs.

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